Thủ Thuật về What term originally referred to a distinct group of people with a shared place of origin but is now? Mới Nhất

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A nation is a territory where all the people are led by the same government.

Nội dung chính

    What do anthropologists call a story that is told about the founding and history of a particular group to reinforce a common sense of identity quizlet?What do we call the process through which new immigrants and their?What is ethnicity in anthropology?What metaphor has been used to describe the process of immigrant assimilation into?

The word “nation” can also refer to a group of people who share a history, traditions, culture and, often, language—even if the group does not have a
country of its own. People within this type of nation share a common identity, and think of themselves as belonging to the same group.

Palestinians, who live in and near the nation of Israel, fit in this category. Though Palestinians share a national identity, elect their own government, and share cultural beliefs, they do not have an internationally
recognized nation of their own.

The United Nations currently recognizes 193 nations around the world, though only 192 are members of the UN’s General Assembly. (Vatican City, which is led by the Roman Catholic Church, is recognized as a
sovereign nation but is not a thành viên of the General Assembly.)

Other nations are not recognized by one or more states for varying reasons. Sometimes, a single nation does not recognize another nation. North Korea and South Korea do not recognize each other as nations, for instance. They each oppose the politics of the other. Other nations that are not fully recognized as of 2011 include
Palestine, Kosovo, Taiwan (known as the Republic of China), and South Ossetia.

The leaders of some unrecognized nations maintain a “government in exile.” These leaders were ousted by social change, such as a revolution, in their country. The leaders currently live in another country, but consider themselves the leaders of their
nation.

Sometimes, people of that nation want the leader to return. Many Tibetans, for instance, look forward to a time when the Dalai Lama, the leader of Tibet’s government in exile, will return to the country. The Dalai Lama has not been to Tibet since 1959, when Tibet became a part of China.

Other times, a government in exile can form entirely outside the nation it wants to govern. The Free Republic of Vietnam considers itself a
government in exile of the nation of Vietnam. The Free Republic of Vietnam was formed after the Vietnam War by emigrants who did not want to live in the new, socialist government of Vietnam.

Indigenous Peoples are distinct social and cultural groups that share collective ancestral ties to the lands and natural resources where they live, occupy or from which they have been displaced. The land and natural resources on which they depend are inextricably linked to their identities, cultures, livelihoods, as well as their physical and spiritual well-being. They often subscribe
to their customary leaders and organizations for representation that are distinct or separate from those of the mainstream society or culture. Many Indigenous Peoples still maintain a language distinct from the official language or languages of the country or region in which they reside; however, many have also lost their languages or on the precipice of extinction due to eviction from their lands and/or relocation to other territories, and in. They speak more than 4,000 of the world’s
languages, though some estimates indicate that more than half of the world’s languages are risk of becoming extinct by 2100.

There are  an estimated 476 million Indigenous Peoples worldwide. Although they make up just 6 percent of the global population, they account for about 19 percent of the extreme poor. Indigenous Peoples’ life expectancy is up to 20 years lower than the life expectancy of non-indigenous people worldwide. Indigenous Peoples often lack formal recognition over their lands, territories
and natural resources, are often last to receive public investments in basic services and infrastructure and face multiple barriers to participate fully in the formal economy, enjoy access to justice, and participate in political processes and decision making. This legacy of inequality and exclusion has made Indigenous peoples more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and natural hazards, including to
disease outbreaks such as COVID-19.  Vulnerabilities to the pandemic are exacerbated in some cases by the lack of access to national health, water, and sanitation systems, the shutting down of markets, and mobility restrictions that have greatly impacted their livelihoods, food insecurity, and well-being.

While Indigenous Peoples own, occupy, or use a quarter of the world’s surface area,
they safeguard 80 percent of the world’s remaining biodiversity. They hold vital ancestral knowledge and expertise on how to adapt, mitigate, and reduce climate and disaster risks. 

Much of the land occupied by Indigenous Peoples is under customary
ownership, yet many governments recognize only a fraction of this land as formally or legally belonging to Indigenous Peoples. Even when Indigenous territories and lands are recognized, protection of boundaries or use and exploitation of natural resources are often inadequate. Insecure land tenure is a driver of conflict, environmental degradation, and weak economic and social development. This threatens cultural survival and vital knowledge systems – loss in these areas increasing risks of
fragility, biodiversity loss, and degraded One Health (or ecological and animal health) systems which threaten the ecosystem services upon which we all depend.

Improving security of land tenure, strengthening governance, promoting public investments in quality and culturally appropriate service provision, and supporting Indigenous systems for resilience and livelihoods are critical to reducing the multidimensional aspects of poverty while contributing to the Sustainable Development Goals
(SDGs). The World Bank works with Indigenous Peoples and governments to ensure that broader development programs reflect the voices and aspirations of Indigenous Peoples.

Over the last 20 years, Indigenous Peoples’ rights have been increasingly recognized through the adoption of international instruments such as the
Regional Agreement on Access to Information, Public Participation and Justice in Environmental matters in Latin America and the Caribbean (Escazú Agreement) in 2022, United Nations Declaration on the Rights
of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in 2007, the American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2022, and the Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention from 1991. At the same time, global institutional mechanisms have been created to promote Indigenous peoples rights such as the United Nations Permanent
Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII), the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (EMRIP), and the UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNSR).

Last Updated: Apr 14, 2022

What do anthropologists call a story that is told about the founding and history of a particular group to reinforce a common sense of identity quizlet?

Ethnic boundary markers. A story that is told about the founding and history of a particular group to reinforce a common sense of identity is called a? Origin Myth.

What do we call the process through which new immigrants and their?

Assimilation, sometimes known as integration or incorporation, is the process by which the characteristics of members of immigrant groups and host societies come to resemble one another.

What is ethnicity in anthropology?

Ethnicity, which relates to culturally contingent features, characterizes all human groups. It refers to a sense of identity and membership in a group that shares common language, cultural traits (values, beliefs, religion, food habits, customs, etc.), and a sense of a common history.

What metaphor has been used to describe the process of immigrant assimilation into?

One form of assimilation is expressed in the metaphor of the “melting pot,” a process in which different groups come together and contribute in roughly equal amounts to create a common culture and a new, unique society. People often think of the American experience of assimilation in terms of the melting pot.
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